Let's talk about wildlife

Mudcat

yap
Since
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
32,603
So that was odd. Driving to work on my usual morning commute, there was a car in front of me - going 60-ish - and suddenly a bird appeared from under it and flew away.

Like the bird must have been on the road and the car passed right over it, and then the bird flew away.

Not something you see every day.
 

roguejuror

south china sea
Since
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
58,198
A young Arctic fox has walked across the ice from Norway's Svalbard islands to northern Canada in a journey covering 3,506 km (2,176 miles) in 76 days.

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At the end the GPS tracker came undone.

Here is this season's ice extent:

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Boner_18

New Member
Since
Oct 5, 2010
Messages
4,854
Orcas been hunting great whites since 1997. Who knew.

 

Blitty

rake922
Since
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
22,258
I installed this nifty bird feeder at my house.

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Now we have a scoundrel squirrel intruder.

Any idea on how to thwart his efforts?
 

Tron

New Member
Since
Jan 28, 2010
Messages
24,881
Bird feeders are awesome

The only downside is you have a 500% chance of attracting squirrels.

*offers no help at all
 

Boner_18

New Member
Since
Oct 5, 2010
Messages
4,854
Fuck bro. Just dispatched a feeder to you as housewarming yesterday. It's a squirrel buster but needs to hang like three feet away from anything so they cant get to it.

Please return (Amazon) and get a wind chime or some other shit instead.
 

Blitty

rake922
Since
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
22,258
Brother boner hooked it up with the deluxe ish!!

Chinga tu madre you pinchy puto skwirl!!!!!


 

roguejuror

south china sea
Since
Jan 24, 2010
Messages
58,198
At the University of Coimbra in central Portugal, there are bats in the biblioteca. They swoop through the stacks, winging over a first-edition of Dionysius of Halicarnassus’s "Roman Antiquities" and past a 15th-century book of hours and Homer's "Opera Omnia" — snapping up bugs as they go.

It’s one of two 18th-century Portuguese libraries where bats are welcome guests, allowed to stay for the bug-eating — and, by extension, manuscript-preserving — services they provide. And visitors to Portugal can see them for themselves.

In Coimbra, a colony of Common pipistrelle bats makes their home behind the bookshelves of the university’s Joanina Library, emerging at nightfall to consume flies and gnats and other pests before swooping out the library windows and across the hilltop college town in search of water. The service they provide is indispensable: They eat insects in the library that might otherwise feed on manuscript pages.

Whether the flittermice took up residence here 300 years ago, when the library was built, or more recently is unknown. Librarians do know they’ve been here since at least the 19th century; they still use fabric made from animal skin, imported from Imperial Russia, to cover the original 18th-century tables, protecting them from scat left by the library’s flying residents. And every morning, just as their forebears did, the librarians remove the skins and clean the library floors.