Got a question. Kinda techyish

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
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Jan 27, 2010
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2021-01-13_15-27.png
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
Since
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
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Nice, Windows doesn't even ask you for a key anymore
Funny thing. When I dual boot my Windows gets activated, obviously running in a virtual machine inside Linux it won't be activated but its not crippled in any meaningful way. I mean you can't customize the background etc but I logged in using my Outlook email and it uses the last background I had on my previous install because its synced with my Microsoft acct.

Of course Windows runs slower inside the VM but its fine for the short spurts I use Windows. If I was going to use Windows a lot I'd dual boot because the performance hit is noticeable. Linux runs sooo fucking fast on my desktop.
 

roguejuror

south china sea
Since
Jan 24, 2010
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57,808
I think you get a performance hit because your CPU is so old, them new Ryzen CPUs can run games, capture video and stream the output, all the while the machine running in a VM without a sweat.

My CPU is a generation older than yours, under W10 with every semiannual feature update it was getting more sluggish, with Pop is like a new machine.
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
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Jan 27, 2010
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I think you get a performance hit because your CPU is so old, them new Ryzen CPUs can run games, capture video and stream the output, all the while the machine running in a VM without a sweat.

My CPU is a generation older than yours, under W10 with every semiannual feature update it was getting more sluggish, with Pop is like a new machine.
I'm a compulsive builder/fixer/tinkerer. In the fall I sold my custom built pc (8th gen intel quad core i3 built in 2018) because I was going to build a brand spanking new Ryzen system. I got this Lenovo 4th gen pc for $90 Canadian without a hard drive as a temp computer until the Ryzen got built.

Then I started asking myself if I really needed a new Ryzen - I don't. This Lenovo does everything I need. 90% of my use is browser based stuff.
A 4th gen quad core i5 with 8GB RAM is fine. I put in a small 120GB SSD for the operating system with a 1TB mechanical hard drive for storage/backup etc and then added a cheap 1GB GTX 710 graphics card ($40 CAD) because the onboard graphics couldn't do 2560X1080 on my ultra-wide monitor.

My current setup is fine. I tried bumping up RAM from 8GB to 16GB and it had ZERO effect and I know this because I had the system monitors running and used benchmark progs to see how it would perform. So 8GB is definitely more than enough for a non gaming pc running Linux.
I pulled the extra 8GB of RAM and sold them on kijiji.

Since the only things I do on my pc are browser based or videos on VLC or Spotify music I really don't need anything more powerful. The SSD is critical to reasonable performance. Plus I've always LOVED Lenovo(IBM) Gigabyte and ASUS since I got involved in pc's years ago.
 

roguejuror

south china sea
Since
Jan 24, 2010
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57,808
You're right for most it's enough. Only I would like is a 4k monitor, mine has an old VGA connector sans a video card so can only do 1080p.
 

Boner_18

New Member
Since
Oct 5, 2010
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4,721
My MIL gave me a mechanical keyboard from WASD.com for Xmas. I dont think i "get it"?
 

Matty

Bringing Sexy Back
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Jan 26, 2010
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clacketyclackclackclack

Unless you're nostalgic for early IBM PC keyboards, they're just annoying.
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
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Jan 27, 2010
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You're right for most it's enough. Only I would like is a 4k monitor, mine has an old VGA connector sans a video card so can only do 1080p.
VGA? That is really old. VGA being phased out and definitely not found on monitors with high resolutions. VGA cant do 4k, not even close.

HDMI & DVI are proprietary and are also being phased out on PC's. I prefer DVI over HDMI because you can tighten the connection with screws which makes it much more secure/stable. If you are someone that connects/disconnects a lot then you'll find your HDMI port connections will get loose over time. Also, its annoying when an HDMI cable comes loose from just slightly moving the PC. The problem I usually have is that most TV's include an HDMI port or VGA but not DVI. Luckily there are always adapters etc that solve this problem.

The KING is Display Port. Its open source, created by geeks and well thought out. It is able to handle much more data than an HDMI connection, has a locking mechanism so the cable stays securely connected and will be my preferred method of connecting to monitors/displays from now on (when possible).
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
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Jan 27, 2010
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So I was looking to challenge myself with Linux. I'm trying to learn Arch Linux, the geekiest of all Linux. No graphical installer, all text based via the command line which makes the installation very time consuming and if you make any mistake your Arch install is fucked.

So I tried it using an online tutorial on Youtube. Actually I tried it a bunch of times, because I fucked up small things many times and had to start over from scratch. I eventually got my Arch setup running. Then I found an easier way, Archfi. Its a script that helps with the install. Much easier than typing every fucking command by hand.

So I'm now on Arch Linux.

2021-02-08_14-09.png
 

Matty

Bringing Sexy Back
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Jan 26, 2010
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I was compiling kernels and installing from floppies back in the day. Early Red Hat distros.
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
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Jan 27, 2010
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26,200
I was compiling kernels and installing from floppies back in the day. Early Red Hat distros.
I tried using RedHat back in the mid 90's and would rather stick a fork in my eye than go through that nonsense ever again. It was very difficult.
I'm indifferent to the command line. I like that I can just copy/paste commands into the terminal because typing isn't my strong suit and if there is any problem with syntax the command will fail. In Windows "s" = "S" & "s", in Linux s=s and nothing else.

Having said all this I find that I don't actually hate or dislike Windows but I really prefer the Linux way. Basic, simple, not bloated, stable, fast.

Firefox is main browser but Chrome has one feature I use that FF doesn't have - speech to text. So when I send an email I just put on my headset and speak into the microphone and voila (thats French) it types my spoken word and is incredibly amazing as its 99.5 % accurate for me.
 

roguejuror

south china sea
Since
Jan 24, 2010
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57,808
Having said all this I find that I don't actually hate or dislike Windows but I really prefer the Linux way. Basic, simple, not bloated, stable, fast.

I'm the same, I don't hate windows but got used to the Linux way and now prefer it.
Firefox is main browser
Try this extension


Containers are like browser profiles, separate cookies/cache/history. You can be on the same website and be logged in with two users at the same time, or maybe just browse logged in one and logged out on the other. Can color code the containers so it's visually easy to distinguish on which one you are and name them. It's all tabs based so it's as easy as clicking a new tab button, don't need a separate windows open. Containers is why I can't use any Chrominum browser anymore.

BbqJr1L.jpg
 

plommer

Not as handsome as TRON
Since
Jan 27, 2010
Messages
26,200
I'm the same, I don't hate windows but got used to the Linux way and now prefer it.

Try this extension "Containers"
Thanks, just added it to Firefox.

Containers is why I can't use any Chrominum browser anymore.

BbqJr1L.jpg
I really love the voice to speech function in Chrome, so much so that I can't ditch it until Firefox or someone else comes up with something that works as well or better. The accuracy of the voice recognition is incredible.

Since Android is Linux I'm not surprised the extension works perfectly when I use Chrome in Arch.